Vantage Point.Virtuosity [art projects]

Select from the following disability themes to view related artwork.

How do you see disability? Student designers at CATEA produced these artworks to illustrate in a positive light that a disability provides a person with a different set of tools to use in navigating this world. If you have any questions about the artwork, please Contact Us.

Blind/Low Vision Artwork

Visual Impairment Coat of Arms

Ben Denzinger
Colored Pencil
16x20
Color


This piece is a representation of the empowerment individuals with visual impairments feel. The layout of the piece is inspired by classical tattoo art. From the braille textured banner to the image of the seeing eye dog, the images of the work symbolize the journey individuals with visual impairments experience throughout their life time from first finding out about the impairment to the actions taken to adapt. The words strength and perseverance displayed across the banner convey the power individuals with visual impairments draw from their experiences. The symbols come together to form a coat of arms for the visually impaired.

Hand

Venece Smith
Electronic Media, Acrylic Paint
20x15
Color


Living in a world so visually oriented, the ability to see is often taken for granted. Though most people can see colors and lines with no problem, there are those who literally use their hands to "see" the world and those who need stark contrasting colors to make out visuals. "Hand" represents those who are visually impaired or blind. It allows others to see and feel just as those who are visually impaired. Braille and a textured outlined hand allows others to "see" the image with his or her hand. The bright contrasting colors against the black background serve as visual aids to those who have a hard time deciphering shapes and text otherwise.

Cognitive Disability Artwork

Changing Winds: Learning Disabilities and Assistive Technology

Mark Thibadeau
Electronic Media
20x15
Black and White


People with learning disabilities often face much bigger challenges on a daily basis than many of us could cope with, especially in their abilities to read and write. In the sky behind the person we see a clearing storm of unorganized letters. The light coming through the clouds is assistive technology - in this case taking the form of a highlighter bar. I chose to use black and white to symbolize the stark contrast between having and not having AT, and so that the rest of us can clearly see the difference.

Communication Disability Artwork

Listen

Matt Allen
Electronic Media, Glass
16x20
Color Collage


This image depicts how communication methods are as varied as those who adopt them. The silhouetted figures shown are each saying "listen" in a different language- sign language, Braille, computer-aided speech, German, and French. Just like those who speak a foreign language, people with communication-related disabilities simply have a different way of speaking. Using different communication methods does not change what you say, it simply changes how those around you must listen.

Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Artwork

Be Heard

Jason Bishop
Watercolor, Ink
16x20
Color


This art piece is dedicated to people with hearing impairments. In a world filled with various sound stimuli - television, radio, the internet - it is easy for many people to forget that our ability to hear comes in varying degrees; no one hears something in the exact same way as another person. It is important for us all to remember those who are hard-of-hearing or experience deafness. The individual depicted here, rather than hide his disability, has emphasized his own uniqueness. The quote by Helen Keller reads: "Not the senses I have but what I do with them is my kingdom." It does not matter that this person has a sensory disability. Rather, what counts is the way he lives his life, which is true of all people.

Mobility Disability Artwork

Reinventing the Wheel

Betsy Sugg
Electronic Media
16x20
Color


While all mobility impairments do not necessarily involve a wheelchair, there is typically a separation within our minds that those who do not walk "normally"are unnatural and different. For this reason, I collected photos to illuminate objects that whirl, twist and spin -- some that are playful and some that generate power or create change. Each image is familiar and full of energy, creating a sense of action as the eye moves through the rows. Finally, the eye reaches the wheelchair, which is parked but aimed to move off the page. At this point the viewer realizes that in fact the wheelchair belongs to this group of pictures in that it is a powerful instrument that accomplishes a goal while reserving the right to be playful. The emphasis here is that the spinning of a wheel is a motion as natural as walking, and it is not something to be set apart.

Move It

Laurel Manross
Electronic Media
16x16
Color


This image depicts frustrations of mobility impairments from both the impaired individual and those who interact with them. The words are packed tightly in a monotonous font, color, and size to convey emotional tension into a visual element. The various words and phrases are all synonyms for the words 'go' and 'move'.

Spin

Laurel Manross
Electronic Media
16x16
Color


This image represents individuality and independence. Those who are affected by mobilty impairments are no less unique than anyone else, and definitely not less creative, deserving or inspired. The kaleidoscope of wheelchairs conveys color, vitality, passion, and intrigue - the core elements of the human spirit.

Saturday

Laurel Manross
Electronic Media
16x16
Color


The purpose of this panel is to dispel any myths people may have about the abilities and/or disabilities of those with mobility impairments. Here a man is portrayed in his business attire and wheel chair, his Monday through Friday look, and again on the right in a kayak and life jacket, his weekend apparel. Too often we are judged by appearances. This man is strong, capable, and happy. He wants nothing more from others than respect and perhaps a little competition.