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* Course Design Models
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Models of Accessible Course Design

The GRADE Project is committed to providing models of accessible design in courses that present challenges due to their nature (engineering, mathematics) or inclusion of rich media. These accessible models were developed in partnership with the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), IDET Communication Inc. (IDET), and the Southeast Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center (Southeast DBTAC):

Designing for the Life Span Course  Course Logo: Adult walking with cane and holding a child's hand.

Description: Undergraduate course in human factors design and engineering offered in four segments that are taught on-site in the Georgia Tech College of Architecture, Industrial Design program as developed Joseph Koncelik, Former Professor, Industrial Design.

Accessibility Problems: The four segments of the original classroom course had extensive PowerPoint slides, graphics, charts, tables and sound files that lacked text descriptions. As a result, the course could not be accessed by students who were unable to see the visual content, or hear the audio.

Solution: Provide a web-based HTML version of the course that contains: logical, consistent navigation; text descriptions for all PowerPoint slides, graphics, charts, and tables; and a transcript for each sound file.

 

Federal Court Concepts Module  Course Logo: Gavel.

Description: Module on the federal court system developed by Curtis D. Edmonds, J.D., a co-principal investigator for GRADE, for instructors teaching high school and undergraduate courses in civics or introductory political science.

Accessibility: This module utilizing PowerPoint slides, Excel charts, and other features has been submitted to the database of the Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT) to serve as a sample best practice in fully accessible design. For more details on the process of creating the module and its accessibility features, review Accessibility of Federal Court Concepts Module and Closing the Circuit: Accessibility from the Ground Up.

 

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Course  Course Logo: Klein bottle

Description: Graduate-level course (ME6601) on the the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, including the derivation of the governing equations of motion and an introduction to viscous, inviscid, turbulent, and boundary-layer flows. It provides preparation for courses in a broad range of engineering disciplines, such as mechanical, bio-engineering, aerospace, and civil engineering. The course is taught by Professor Paul Neitzel from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia.

Accessibility Problems: The original distance-education course relied heavily upon video that was inaccessible to those with low vision or blindness, contained on web pages that were not designed for accessibility. The video included no captioning and the web pages were difficult or impossible to navigate for users who could not see them. In addition, the course made frequent use of mathematical equations, charts, images and other files that lacked textual equivalents. These elements were unusable to those who could not see the visual representations.

Solution: Provide a web-based HTML version for six modules from the course. Each module contains: logical, consistent navigation; text descriptions for all PowerPoint slides, graphics, charts, and tables; captioned videos with transcripts; and accessible Word documents containing descriptions and references for mathematical equations.

 

Scientific Perspectives on World Hunger Course  Course Logo: Hungry child

Description: An undergraduate-level course (PERS2002) explores the issues associated with malnutrition, access to food, and linkages between malnutrition and development; there is also dialogue for exploring some agricultural and food technologies as application of science and science as one facet of public policy on hunger. The course is taught by Mildred M. Cody, Ph.D., R.D.; Laura G. Burtle, MSLS; and Susmita Datta, Ph.D. from Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Accessibility Problems: The original classroom course had extensive PowerPoint slides, graphics, charts, and tables that lacked text descriptions as well as videos that lacked captioning. As a result, the course could not be accessed by students who were unable to see the visual content, or hear the audio.

Solution: Provide a web-based HTML version of the course that contains: logical, consistent navigation; text descriptions for all PowerPoint slides, graphics, charts, and tables; and captioned videos with transcripts.


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